University of Glasgow

History

  • Founded in 1451, the University of Glasgow has dedicated more than 560 years to inspiring great minds, from economist Adam Smith and pioneer of television John Logie Baird, to the writer and producer of Doctor Who and Sherlock, Steven Moffat. 
  • The University has inspired the talents of seven Nobel Laureates, one Prime Minister, Scotland's current First Minister and the country's first female medical graduates.
  • Glasgow’s beautiful, historical campus features more than 100 listed buildings.

Location and Transport

  • Scotland's biggest city, Glasgow hosts the largest student population in Scotland. Is the UK’s third largest city and one of the world’s top student cities.
  • It is the UK’s first UNESCO City of Music, host to around 130 music events every week.
  • Glasgow was the host to the 2014 Commonwealth Games.
  • The University’s location means that students can enjoy the combination of living in a compact campus-style environment while being part of a major city. 
  • There are two campuses in Glasgow: Gilmorehill in the cosmopolitan and friendly West End; and Garscube, 6.5 km (4 miles) from the city. A third campus in Dumfries some 145 km (90 miles) to the south of Glasgow, is home to the University’s School of Interdisciplinary Studies.
  • Both city campuses have excellent transport into Glasgow’s centre via frequent buses and subway. Glasgow International Airport, Glasgow Prestwick International Airport and two city centre rail terminals offer easy connections with the rest of the UK and the world.
  • Glasgow a lively nightlife with more than 700 bars, pubs and nightclubs and seven cinemas, including the tallest in the world.
  • It is consistently voted as the top place to shop in the UK, outside London’s West End.
  • Home to over 90 parks and public gardens, and has more than 20 museums and art galleries including the Riverside Museum, which was voted European Museum of the Year 2013.